Adam Ibrahim’s short story features at Critical Muslim’s issue 30

Skeleton of an Indricotherium at a Palaeonthology Museum in Moscow


A Short Story written by a Nigerian writer and author of Season of Crimsons Blossom, Abubakar Adam Ibrahim, has been featured in the 30th issue of Critical Muslim, the influential Hurst quarterly magazine showcasing ground-breaking thinking on Islam and what it means to be a Muslim in a rapidly changing, interconnected world.

The last issue, which focuses on West Africa especially its rich cultural and political geography, was guest-edited by Bissau-Guinean writer Yovanka Paquete Perdigao and Henry Brefo.

Other short stories featured in the latest edition of the magazine were these of the Cameroonian Bakwa Magazine editor Dzekashu Mcviban, poetry by the Ghanaian Brunel Prize finalist Victoria Adukwei Bullet, and essays by the Angolan writer-musician Kalaf Epalanga and BookShy blogger Zahrah Nesbitt-Ahmed.

The 256-page issue, released in April and available on Amazon, will be launched at the London School of Economics on 15 May.

With the Pakistani-British writer and cultural critic Ziauddin Sardar as editor, each issue of Critical Muslim “centers on a discrete theme, and contributions include reportage, academic analysis, cultural commentary, photography, poetry, and book reviews,” a statement posted on the magazine stated in part.

“’How does one navigate the rich cultural and political geography of West Africa?’ ‘Mapping the diverse manifestations of Islamic influence’, are some of the articles that brings together the resplendent but manifold articulations of Muslim and African identity.

“From the forest kingdom of precolonial Ashanti to the cultural theatres of free and independent Senegal, Islam astounds nobility and flirts with creativity. A human story of struggle, living, belonging, and daring unfolds.

“Yovanka Paquete Perdigao and Henry Brefo navigate the rich cultural and political geography of West Africa by telling the Lion’s story, Shanka Mesa Siverio relates her experience of architecture, culture and identity, Henry Brefo laments that we were once friends, Jean-Ann Ndow explores West Africa’s history through the song and dance of Griots.

“Peter Griffiths takes a tour of West African cities, Hafeez Burhan Khan thrills with tales of book smugglers in Timbuktu, Estrella Sendra is at the cinema with Ousmane Sembène, Kalaf Epalanga gets his Afrobeat groove on, Hang Zhou sees potential in the African Yuan, Nouriah Bah finds evidence of the legacy of Pan-Africanism today and Zahrah Nesbitt-Ahmed has the perfect answer to the endless questioning of her identity.

“Also in this issue: Tam Hussein on his encounter with Jihadis, Ngadi Smart introduces us to faces of Abissa, Shanon Shah decolonises the book of kings, Samia Rahman learns about giants of an Islamic past, Natasha Koverola Commisiong finds Africa in Somerset House and Gemma Edom goes fishing in Akure, [and] short stories by Abubakar Adam Ibrahim and Dzekashu MacViban, poems by Victoria Adukwei Bulley, “The Last Word on My Generation” by Oluwagbemileke Joy Jegede. And Yovanka Paquete Perdigao has some stern words of advice on what not to do when visiting West Africa.”

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