‘Diabetes, obesity responsible for 29% deaths in Nigeria’




The National Secretary, Diabetes Association of Nigeria, Comrade Bernard Enyia, has disclosed that diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular diseases are responsible for 29 percent of deaths in Nigeria.

Enyia, who spoke at a webinar organised by a coalition, National Action on Sugar Reduction (NASR), also  stated that 38.7 million litres of soft drinks are sold yearly in Nigeria, which according to him, are contributors to the prevalence of Non-communicable (NCD) related diseases.

He said excessive Sugar-Sweetened Beverages (SSBs) is linked to many non-communicable diseases like type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and high blood pressure.

The assocaition’s scribe, however, advocated the introduction of an excise duty of 20% on sugar-sweetened beverages such as carbonated soft drinks and energy drinks.

He said the revenue from the tax should be used to the prevention and treatment of Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs).

“38.7 Million litres of soft drinks are sold yearly in Nigeria, contributing to the prevalence of NCD related diseases. The country is ranked the 4th highest ranking soft drink consuming country in the world.

“Also, 29% of deaths in Nigeria are NCD related (diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular diseases).  $4.5 billionis spent yearly by Nigerians on the treatment of biabetes only one of a number of NCDs.

“Excessive SSB consumption is linked to many NCDs, including type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure. Government should introduce an excise duty of 20% on sugar-sweetened beverages such as carbonated soft drinks and energy drinks. The tax revenue should be used to fund the prevention and treatment of non-communicable diseases (NCDs),” he said.

In his presentation titled: “An overview of NCD burden and risk factors in Nigeria”, Dr. Alayo Sopekan of the Federal Ministry of Health, said the rapid rise of NCDs represents one of the major health challenges to global development in the coming century. 
Sopekan, a deputy director said: “The rapid rise of NCDs represents one of the major health challenges to global development in the coming century. 

“This growing challenge threatens economic and social development as well as the lives and health of millions of people across the world. Risk factors, such as tobacco and alcohol use, improper nutrition and sedentary lifestyles contribute substantially to the development of NCDs, which are sweeping the entire globe, with an increasing trend mostly in developing countries like Nigeria where, the epidemiological transition imposes more constraints to deal with an increasing burden of overpopulation and the existing communicable diseases.”

Also, the President, Nigeria Cancer Society, Dr. Adamu Al-hassan, whose presentation was titled: “Using community particaption to achieve healthy food policies”, said attudinal behaviours of some Nigerians were responsible for the rising cases of non-communicable diseases.