Votes in 18 nations ‘hacked’ in last year




Officials of Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) count ballots during gubernatorial and local assembly elections in Lagos on April 11, 2015. Nigeria began counting votes from state governor and local assembly elections on April 11, with the main opposition party tipped to build on its historic victory in the presidential race. AFP PHOTO / PIUS UTOMI EKPEI

 

Elections in 18 separate nations were influenced by online disinformation campaigns last year, suggests research.
Independent watchdog Freedom House looked at how online discourse was influenced by governments, bots and paid opinion formers.
In total, 30 governments were actively engaged in using social media to stifle dissent, said the report.
Educating users to spot fake news and making tech firms police their networks could combat the , it said.
The annual report studied the state of internet freedom across 65 nations – covering about 87% of the world’s net-using population.
For the seventh year running, it said, net freedom had declined as governments stepped up efforts to control what citizens said, did and shared online.
Used alongside more overt technical controls such as firewalls, content filters and blocks on technical tools such as virtual private networks, the of social media had become a key tool for repressive regimes, it said.
“Not only is this difficult to detect, it is more difficult to combat than other types of censorship, such as website blocking, because it’s dispersed and because of the sheer number of people and bots deployed to do it,” said Sanja Kelly, head of the Freedom on the Net research project.
Ms Kelly said China and Russia had pioneered widespread net controls but the techniques had now gone “global”.
Many other nations, including Turkey, the Philippines, Syria and Ethiopia, now employed them extensively, she said.
“The effects of these rapidly spreading techniques on democracy and civic activism are potentially devastating,” added Ms Kelly.
Official efforts to control debate were most obvious during elections, said the Freedom House report – which were held in 18 of the countries researchers examined.
Usually the activity was contained within one nation, but increasingly governments were looking to social media to subvert debate beyond their own borders.
Russia, in particular, said the report, had made significant efforts to influence the US presidential election.

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